Themes And Characters In A Raisin In The Sun Essays

Hansberry is able to dispel many of the myths about Africa, and concretely depict the parallel struggles both Africans and African-Americans must face. A comparison between the life of Lorraine Hansberry and her Play «A Raisin in the Sun» What is it that caused Lorraine Hansberry to portray a family like the Younger’s in » A Raisin in the Sun»? In fact » A Raisin in the sun», and «Native Son» start off the same way with an alarm clock ringing. So much that she probably decided to write a play with the theme of a family moving into an environment where they were not wanted when she wrote «A Raisin in the Sun».

a raisin in the sun theme essay

By thinking big, they refuse to be the raisins in the sun of Langston Hughes’ poem (‘Montage of a Dream Deferred’). Read Jason Reynold’s poem «For Everyone», and in a personal response to the play and the poem, create a poem depicting thoughts, feelings, and insights about dreams. Raisin In The SunRaisin In The Sun The action of the play takes place in the poor South side of Chicago, sometime exploratory essay examples after World War II, probably around 1959. Most of the action takes place in the apartment of the Youngers, especially in the living/dining room and near the bathroom that they share with the Johnson family. Some of the action also takes place in the kitchen and in the two small bedrooms.

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Several minor characters have a major impact on the story and serve an important function within the play. Choose minor characters and show their significance and how they serve to further elevate a theme. Consider George research papers writers Murchison, Joseph Asagai, the neighbor, Mrs. Johnson, Mr. Karl Linder, and/or Willy Harris. Write an essay in which you identify the gender dynamics in the play, considering whether the gender roles are as rigid or scripted as they appear to be.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

Whether or not Ruth will actually decide on an abortion is debatable, for Ruth says to Mama in Act I, «Ain’t no thin’ can tear at you like losin’ your baby.» Ruth says this as Mama is recounting the pain of having lost her own baby, Claude. At this point in the play, Ruth’s pregnancy has not yet been verified, but the dialogue spawned by the abortion controversy in this drama is as relevant today as it was in 1959, when the play opened. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter.

She used the dialect of the African American community that is not only distinct but also pure. The characters speak in their domestic setting and individual style as Beneatha and Asagai show their superior and formal education even in everyday conversation, while Mama, Mrs. Johnson, and Ruth demonstrate their crude language. The diction and tone of the play, too, suit the community, neighborhood as well as main audience. Lorraine mostly turns to irony, sarcasm, and other devices of figurative language to make her dialogs effective. Beneatha also adds to the family problems by rejecting George Murchison and accepting Joseph Asagai who wants her to complete her medical education first. During the breakup with Beneatha, George says that he didn’t show interest in her because they could talk about ‘quiet desperation.

Difficulities In The Play A Raisin In The Sun By Lorraine Hansberry

Petrie revises Hansberry’s play by making slight changes to the setting, character development and interactions. He alters the setting by the presentation of the Youngers furniture to give the appearance that they are less impoverished. Petrie presents Beneatha’s character as foolish and immature rather than Hansberry’s version being an African American women embracing her heritage and rebelling against societal constraints. In the play Joseph Asagai plays a pivotal role in encouraging Beneatha to break through society’s oppression by pushing her to embrace her roots.

  • Lena’s life’s dreams are not for herself, but for her family’s future generations.
  • Mama, on the other hand, is grateful for being able to have the opportunity to give birth to a healthy baby, since she knows that at the time many African-American babies were dying from poverty, and just a short time before, from slavery.
  • During the summer of 2020, she produced a project in which she recorded herself playing each song from Rubén Blades and Willie Colón’s 1978 album, Siembra.

The mom may have three or four kids; the boys in the family may be involved in gangs because they don’t have a dad in the house; and mom may have two jobs because she only makes the minimum wage and can’t buy enough food on just one job. There are a lot of people who just barely make it from paycheck to paycheck. So don’t be fooled, I would say to that man, because even though life is a lot better than it was in 1959, there are still a lot of problems and many black families still struggle. Okay, what would he say, how would he react, to seeing a Raisin in the Sun, if he were to see it today on Broadway? I can imagine he would enjoy it a lot, but he would probably think to himself, there aren’t that many black folks who have to live in squalor like that anymore. Thank God, he would say to himself, life has gotten better for most black families.

A garden and a yard are also discussed when mama’s desire for these things are revealed. She wishes that her gardening skills only became better with practice with this plant. These aspects of nature reveal much about the inner character of mama.

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Juan Pablo Freddi
Juan Pablo Freddi

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